"Who taught you to hate the color of your skin?
Who taught you to hate the texture of your hair?
Who taught you to hate the shape of your nose and the shape of your lips?
Who taught you to hate yourself from the top of your head to the soles of your feet?
Who taught you to hate your own kind?
Who taught you to hate the race that you belong to so much so that you don’t want to be around each other?"
- Malcom X, 1962 (via uniqueroots)

(via lindaandloveovereverything)

"every time you
tell your daughter
you yell at her
out of love
you teach her to confuse
anger with kindness
which seems like a good idea
till she grows up to
trust men who hurt her
cause they look so much
like you."
- to fathers with daughtersrupi kaur (via 33113)

(via novalola)

"

Dear young Black men. Sag your pants if you want to. Wear super tight skinny jeans if you want to. Wear hoodies if you want to. Wear your long locks, your dashiki, cover yourself in tattoos - yes even on your face. Wear all white. It is not true that if we dress the way that whiteness determine is the most ‘professional’ that you will be granted more freedom, more jobs, better salaries or will it keep you out of prison. The prison is full of generations of Black men who never sagged their pants at all. Black men have never made more than .74 for every dollar a white man makes extending as far back to 1970, when it was .69 and I imagine these men were not sagging their pants either.

When white people went all the way to the African continent to get out of doing work (only to turn around and call us lazy after African enslaved people have literally done all the work) and they saw us as kings, queens, farmers, artists, weavers and we were also not sagging our pants, they still began a genocide whose effects persist even today. If that was all it took, just to dress like they say, or speak like they say and only when spoken to, then don’t you think our ancestors would have tried that? And in fact many of them did, tried very hard to meet all the standards that were established, assimilated into their schools, adopted their religion, speaking their language and we still are not free. Black men get shot and murdered in suits, and sweaters, black boys in tshirts and hoodies. The way that they dress has NOTHING to do with the war that has been declared on their bodies. I applaud every Black man trying to stay alive, saying fuck you to ‪#‎respectabilitypolitics‬ with your braidup tight and the ones who hold their own in a suit and those wearing long robes. I will always fight for your right to wear whatever you please, and to have the self-determination to make your own choices about your bodies.

"
- Kim Katrin Milan, multidisciplinary artist, activist, consultant, facilitator and educator (via whitegirlsaintshit)

(Source: allyssamilan, via minidlamini)

"Someone once told me a story about long term relationships. To think of them as a continent to explore. I could spend a lifetime backpacking through Africa, and I would still never know all there is to know about that continent. To stay the course, to stay intentional, to stay curious and connected – that’s the heart of it. But it’s so easy to lose track of the trail, to get tired, to want to give up, or to want a new adventure. It can be so easy to lose sight of the goodness and mystery within the person sitting right in front of you."
- Joy Williams  (via awelltraveledwoman)

(Source: solar-orphan, via andtwiceonsunday)